Cambridge Community Kirtan

Cambridge Community Kirtan

As our Community Kirtan program grows, we are touched and inspired by the photos, recordings and writings that come from the different communities. It is an honor to then share these with you. Below is from our Cambridge Community Kirtan and we hope you enjoy a small glimpse into what they are creating. If you want to learn more, visit our Community Kirtan page and click on the city of interest.     From the Cambridge Community Kirtan: A wonderful experience of collective singing of Bhajans was arranged by the Cambridge Community Kirtan on the warm Wednesday evening of Jun 21, 2017 at the Cambridge Swedenborg Chapel, Cambridge, MA. Excited devotees of Cambridge and surrounding areas gathered to sing Bhajans and mantras with well known devotional singers, Mr. Scott Hari Whitmore, Rachel, and Tom Lena. Tom Len welcomed warmly all the devotees and thanked them for attending the event with family and friends. Scott Hari Whitmore is taking the lead on organizing Kirtan evenings with Jennifer Canfield from the Call and Response foundation. International Yoga Day was celebrated by the devotees with Bhakti Yoga Bliss. Like Yoga, Collective chanting, is gaining interest in the United States. Kirtan format of chanting is a type of yoga in itself and has many of the mind-calming benefits of yoga. Kirtan has varying effects for different people, offers the possibility for the stillness of mind, without the struggle or striving to concentrate. Kirtan practice helps to focus the mind. By simply repeating mantras or words, you can release your mind from its daily chatter. For some, the practice has a powerful heart-opening effect...

Chanting and Sound Across Spiritual Traditions and Cultures

by: Jo Meszaros Many Christian traditions and the Catholic tradition specifically, use repetitive prayers and chants in their services. ”Chanting is an important part of the Jewish cabalistic tradition. Native Americans centered many of their religious rituals on chanting. Buddhists and Sufis chant mantras, and Muslims use repetitive prayers,” notes Dr. Khalsa, author of Meditation as Medicine. Dr. Oakes, PhD, and author or Sound Health Sound Wealth, refers to Ancient cultures using sound and light for healing. She describes Egyptian temples of light, aboriginal healing with sounds, and gem elixirs from India. She cites the use of sound and light in modern medical practice. MRIs, ultrasound, and laser surgery are used to diagnose and promote healing. Russill Paul, author of The Yoga of Sound states, “Every culture has its own form of sonic mysticism. Gospel music manifests the spiritual power of sound, as do symphony orchestras, Hebrew cantors, Sufi Qawwali singers, Siberian shamans, Benedictine monks, and the Tibetan Gyuto choir… Many ancient cultures viewed physical illness as a lack of harmony in the body; they used sound and music to restore this natural condition.” Paul also points out that modern medicine also uses sound waves to dissolve gallstones and kidney stones without surgery. Currently, in the West, there are many kirtan artists and performers blending their own musical backgrounds, training, and styles with devotional chanting. “And although purists might argue otherwise, kirtan’s new generation of musicians believe that the genre-bending chants are still connecting our hearts to God,” according to Sexton and Dubrovsky authors of a September 2011 Yoga Journal article about the rise in popularity of kirtan. Click...

Chanting and Sound Across Spiritual Traditions and Cultures

by: Jo Meszaros Many Christian traditions and the Catholic tradition specifically, use repetitive prayers and chants in their services. ”Chanting is an important part of the Jewish cabalistic tradition. Native Americans centered many of their religious rituals on chanting. Buddhists and Sufis chant mantras, and Muslims use repetitive prayers,” notes Dr. Khalsa, author of Meditation as Medicine. Dr. Oakes, PhD, and author or Sound Health Sound Wealth, refers to Ancient cultures using sound and light for healing. She describes Egyptian temples of light, aboriginal healing with sounds, and gem elixirs from India. She cites the use of sound and light in modern medical practice. MRIs, ultrasound, and laser surgery are used to diagnose and promote healing. Russill Paul, author of The Yoga of Sound states, “Every culture has its own form of sonic mysticism. Gospel music manifests the spiritual power of sound, as do symphony orchestras, Hebrew cantors, Sufi Qawwali singers, Siberian shamans, Benedictine monks, and the Tibetan Gyuto choir… Many ancient cultures viewed physical illness as a lack of harmony in the body; they used sound and music to restore this natural condition.” Paul also points out that modern medicine also uses sound waves to dissolve gallstones and kidney stones without surgery. Currently, in the West, there are many kirtan artists and performers blending their own musical backgrounds, training, and styles with devotional chanting. “And although purists might argue otherwise, kirtan’s new generation of musicians believe that the genre-bending chants are still connecting our hearts to God,” according to Sexton and Dubrovsky authors of a September 2011 Yoga Journal article about the rise in popularity of kirtan. Click...

Chanting and Sound Across Spiritual Traditions and Cultures

by: Jo Meszaros Many Christian traditions and the Catholic tradition specifically, use repetitive prayers and chants in their services. ”Chanting is an important part of the Jewish cabalistic tradition. Native Americans centered many of their religious rituals on chanting. Buddhists and Sufis chant mantras, and Muslims use repetitive prayers,” notes Dr. Khalsa, author of Meditation as Medicine. Dr. Oakes, PhD, and author or Sound Health Sound Wealth, refers to Ancient cultures using sound and light for healing. She describes Egyptian temples of light, aboriginal healing with sounds, and gem elixirs from India. She cites the use of sound and light in modern medical practice. MRIs, ultrasound, and laser surgery are used to diagnose and promote healing. Russill Paul, author of The Yoga of Sound states, “Every culture has its own form of sonic mysticism. Gospel music manifests the spiritual power of sound, as do symphony orchestras, Hebrew cantors, Sufi Qawwali singers, Siberian shamans, Benedictine monks, and the Tibetan Gyuto choir… Many ancient cultures viewed physical illness as a lack of harmony in the body; they used sound and music to restore this natural condition.” Paul also points out that modern medicine also uses sound waves to dissolve gallstones and kidney stones without surgery. Currently, in the West, there are many kirtan artists and performers blending their own musical backgrounds, training, and styles with devotional chanting. “And although purists might argue otherwise, kirtan’s new generation of musicians believe that the genre-bending chants are still connecting our hearts to God,” according to Sexton and Dubrovsky authors of a September 2011 Yoga Journal article about the rise in popularity of kirtan. Click...

Poem by Jacopone da Todi

Poem by Jacopone da Todi, a Fanciscan friar from Umbria, Italy who wrote sacred and mystic poetry. It is the love of the mystic, the love so beautifully expressed by the Franciscan poet Jacopone da Todi: Love, love, my heart is so broken; love, love, I am so wounded. Love, love, your beauty draws me to you; love, love, I am fully enwrapped in you. Love, love, I disdain to live; love, love, my spirit is united with you. Love, you are its life and it cannot be separated from you. Love, why do you make it languish, hugging you so? Love, love, desired Jesus, I want to die embracing you. Love, love, Jesus, my sweet spouse; love, love, I ask death of you. Love, love, Jesus so delightful, you give yourself to me, transforming me into you. I think I will faint. Love, I don’t know where I am. Jesus, my hope, cast me into the abyss of...

Pin It on Pinterest